genomics
Professor Sue Hill, NHS England Senior Responsible Officer for Genomics, said: “It is a very exciting time in the UK for genomics at the moment - we are now starting to see the early findings from the 100,000 Genomes Project and learning how we can use, adapt and introduce whole genome sequencing (WGS) into clinical care in the UK."

The government has launched an inquiry into genomics and genome-editing

[London, UK] The Science and Technology Committee has set up an inquiry into genomics and genome-editing as written statements have to be submitted by January 2017.

The Committee has to address the impact of genomics on wildlife and ecosystems, plants, animals and human health and see whether the current regulatory system is consistent in meeting the necessary requirements of approval processes; Genomics England’s 100,000 sequenced genomes initiative, ethical and safety concerns, investment appropriation and the Industrial Strategy initiative.

In an interview with BJ-HC, Professor Sue Hill, NHS England Senior Responsible Officer for Genomics, talked about the current state of genomics in the UK.

“It is a very exciting time in the UK for genomics at the moment - we are now starting to see the early findings from the 100,000 Genomes Project and learning how we can use, adapt and introduce whole genome sequencing (WGS) into clinical care in the UK.

“It’s clear from international conversations that this is an area where the UK is leading the world in so many respects. Scientists and clinicians are now devising, developing and testing new approaches to, for example tumour tissue sample handling, preparation and assessment methodology – setting global standards for tumour DNA extraction, whole genome sequencing and its analysis,” she said.

New sequencing centre in Cambridge

Last month a new sequencing centre was opened at the Wellcome Genome Campus in Cambridge, where the 100,000 Genomes Project is currently being developed.

The initiative represents one of the largest projects of its kind in the world as patients are set to benefit from the design of personalised treatments.

“NHS patients will be the first to benefit from discoveries made from this project.  The 100,000 Genomes Project Genome Sequencing Centre has already enabled us to feedback results to participants with rare diseases who had not achieved a diagnosis through routine healthcare,” said Mark Caulfield, Chief Scientist for Genomics England, in a statement.

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