DNA, genomics
Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) for NHS England, Sue Hill, said: “We need to be in a position to procure genomic sequencing for the NHS by 2018 and we know this we lead to improve diagnosis for the patient.”

Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) for NHS England, Sue Hill, delivered her talk at UK e-Health Week on the plans for the Genome Project over the next 10 years

(London, UK) Future plans for the Genome Project have been framed by Sue Hill at UK e-Health Week today, as numerous areas, including models of care and infrastructure, will be completed within the next 10 years.

Hill gave a detailed analysis on how the Genomes Project has evolved since she became CSO and spoke about developments with the project.

Genomic lab infrastructure, new pathways and models of care, functional genomic pathways and personalised medicine are key areas that Hill wants completed by 2026.

Furthermore, closer alignment between clinical practice and research for mutual benefit, improved outcomes for patients, new partnerships with industry and a greater public understanding of the impact and value of genomics will contribute greatly to the structure of the Genomes Project over the next decade.

BJ-HC spoke to Hill about how realistic implementing all of these plans will be within the next decade. She said: “This will be an evolving and increasing investment.

“The most important thing is that it is on the basis of evidence and on the basis of the potential to improve the outcome for patients and drive efficiency and value for money.

“We need to be in a position to procure genomic sequencing for the NHS by 2018 and we know this will lead to improve diagnosis for the patient.”

Hill also told BJ-HC why UK e-Health Week is so important to the Genomes Project, in providing a platform to communicate her vision. She added: “An event like this brings those who want to learn more about what’s happening.

“To deliver this effectively we all need to work together and this is a really good opportunity to understand the common agenda and the common goal in what we want to achieve.”

 

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